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This week there were three unemployment unpublished decisions from the Minnesota Court of Appeals. Two relators challenge the ULJ’s decision that they are ineligible for unemployment benefits because they committed employment misconduct and the third relator cites several reasons for challenging the ULJ’s decision that he is ineligible for unemployment benefits. All three were affirmed.

1.  A13-2026   James Richarson, Jr., Relator, vs. Alamco Wood Products LLC, Respondent, Department of Employment and Economic Development, Respondent.

Summary: Relator James Richardson Jr. challenges the unemployment-law judge’s decision that he is ineligible for unemployment benefits because he committed employment misconduct. Because the unemployment-law judge’s findings are supported by substantial evidence, and because Richardson’s violation of the no-smoking policy is employment misconduct, we affirm.

2.  A13-2370  Steve Morris Smith, Relator, vs. Family Life Mental Health Center, Respondent, Department of Employment and Economic Development, Respondent.

Summary:  On appeal from the determination of an unemployment-law judge (ULJ) that he is ineligible for unemployment benefits because he was discharged for employment misconduct, appellant argues that the ULJ: (1) erred by determining that he is ineligible for unemployment benefits; and (2) abused his discretion by denying his request for an additional evidentiary hearing. We affirm.

3.  A13-2347  Brian Freed, Relator, vs. Wholesale Tire & Wheel of MN, Inc., Respondent, Department of Employment and Economic Development, Respondent.

 Summary: Relator Brian Freed challenges the determination of the unemployment-law judge (ULJ) that he is ineligible for unemployment benefits, arguing that (1) he made a good-faith error in judgment; (2) his conduct was that of a reasonable average employee; (3) respondent-employer lied during his testimony at the evidentiary hearing; and (4) respondent-employer engaged in employer retaliation. We affirm.

If you are denied unemployment benefits, or are an employer who wants to challenge a former employee's eligibility for benefits, your best bet is to meet with an attorney who handles unemployment appeals to discuss your options.  To that end, I represent both applicants and employers in unemployment appeals.  Please call (763) 450-9494 today to set up an appointment to discuss your situation.

WARNING: The information contained in this blog post does not constitute legal advice and may not be applicable to your situation.  Reading this blog post does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Baland Law Office, P.L.L.C.  Also, Tim is licensed only in state and federal courts in Minnesota.  As such, any information provided in this blog post pertains only to those jurisdictions.  Further, you should always discuss your situation with an attorney before taking any action based on what you may read in this blog.  To that end, please call (763) 450-9494 to set up an appointment to discuss your situation. 

 


Comments

07/25/2015 6:36am

Without the strong education system the country cannot able to become strong and successful. The educated people should give the awareness to the people of the society about the importance of the education.

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07/30/2016 6:02pm

The law office is for the people. Many people try their best for job. This effort leads them for their un employment allowance. This can be done by the efforts of law people. They make the case in such way that government makes monthly un employment allowance for them.

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